8 Gambling Words That Hit It Big | Merriam-Webster

User Login

Remember me
Calendar It is currently 02.01.2020

Gambling card games

Glossary of video game terms

Apologise, but, gambling anime ludicrous face
94 posts В• Page 845 of 425

Gambling card games lexicon online

Postby Gunris В» 02.01.2020

.

This list includes terms used in video games and the video game industry , as well as slang used by players. Also triple A. Also aim down sights. Also control stick and thumbstick. A term used in many role-playing and strategy games to describe attacks or other effects that affect multiple targets within a specified area.

In most tactical strategy games artillery weapons have an area of effect that will damage anyone within a radius of the strike zone. Often the effect is stronger on the target than on anything else hit. See also: Splash damage.

Area of effect can also refer to spells and abilities that are non-damaging. For example, a powerful healing spell may affect anyone within a certain range of the caster often only if they are a member of the caster's party. Some games also have what are referred to as "aura" abilities that will affect anyone in the area around the person with the ability. For example, many strategy games have hero or officer units that can improve the morale and combat performance of friendly units around them.

The inclusion of AoE elements in game mechanics can increase the role of strategy, especially in turn-based game s. The player has to place units wisely to mitigate the possibly devastating effects of a hostile area of effect attack; however, placing units in a dense formation could result in gains that outweigh the increased AoE damage received.

Point-blank area of effect PBAoE is a less-used term for when the affected region is centered on the character performing the ability, rather than at a location of the player's choosing. Also display mode and show mode. A pre-recorded demonstration of a video game that is displayed when the game is not being played.

Originally built into arcade game s, the main purpose of the attract mode is to entice passers-by to play the game. In Atari home video games of the s and s, the term attract mode was sometimes used to denote a simple screensaver that slowly cycled the display colors to prevent phosphor burn-in while the game was not being played.

Attract modes demonstrating gameplay are common in current home video games. Attract mode is not only found in arcade games, but in most coin-operated games like pinball machines , stacker machines and other games. Cocktail arcade machines on which the screen flips its orientation for each player's turn in two-player games traditionally have the screen's orientation in player 1's favour for the attract mode.

Also aim-assist. Also achievement. Also beta testing. Also story mode and campaign. For the book, see Console Wars book. A common term in video games for the option to continue the game after all of the player's lives have been lost, rather than ending the game and restarting from the very beginning.

There may or may not be a penalty for doing this, such as losing a certain number of points or being unable to access bonus stages. In arcade game s, when a player loses or fails an objective, they will generally be shown a "continue countdown" screen, in which the player has a limited amount of time usually 10, 15, or 20 seconds to insert additional coins in order to continue the game from the point where it had ended; deciding not to continue will result in the displaying of a game over screen.

The continue feature was added to arcade games in the mids due to arcade owners wanting to earn more money from players who played for longer periods of time. In more modern times, continues have also been used in a number of free-to-play games, especially mobile games , where the player is offered a chance to pay a certain amount of premium currency to continue after failing or losing.

An example of this would be Temple Run 2 , where the price of a continue doubles after each failure, with an on-the-fly in-app purchase of the game's premium currency if required. An analogy can be made to the reload time and firing rate of weapons. For example, a machine gun has very fast firing rate, so it has a very low cooldown between shots. Comparatively, a shotgun has a long cooldown between shots.

Cooldown can be used to balance a weapon such as a turret-mounted machine gun having infinite ammunition, since it can only sustain continuous fire until reaching a threshold at which the weapon would have to cool down hence the term before it could be fired again.

In design terms, cooldown can be thought of as an inverted 'casting time' where instead of requiring a wait time before using an ability, cooldown may replace casting time and put the wait after the ability is activated.

This creates a new dimension to the balancing act of casting speed versus power: "lower cooldown, faster cast, but weaker strength" versus "higher cooldown, slower cast, but greater strength". This mechanic is integral to such games as World of Warcraft , where cooldown management is key to higher-level play and various abilities deal with cooldown for example, cooldown reduction or immediately finishing cooldown on certain abilities. From the technical point of view, cooldown can also be used to assert control over frequency of cast in order to maintain a fluid frame rate and ping.

For example, in the game Diablo II , cooldown was added in the form of a patch to several graphically and CPU-intensive spells to solve the problem of extreme lag caused by players spamming ie: repeatedly casting at maxed out cast rates these spells in multiplayer games.

Each move has a certain number of frames in which it is considered to be "recovering" before another move can be executed, which is similar to cooldown in concept. However, there is no player control over the character during recovery frames, and the character can not perform any movement or attacks until fully recovered.

Because the character is vulnerable during recovery, strategic use of skills is necessary to make sure the opponent cannot immediately counter the player-character. Also crit. Also cinematic. Also control pad and directional pad. Also release date. Also free-for-all. Also conversation tree.

See also level. Also electronic sports , e-sports , eSports , competitive gaming , cybersports and professional gaming. Also field of vision. Also invincibility frames , invulnerability period , mercy invincibility. Also gameplay mechanics. Also gameplay mode. Ghost cars in racing games generally appear as translucent or flashing versions of the player's vehicle. Based on previously recorded lap times, they serve only to represent the fastest lap time and do not interact dynamically with other competitors.

A skilled player will use the ghost to improve their time, matching the ghost's racing line as it travels the course. Some also have ghosts set by staff members and developers, often showing perfect routes and lap times. A variation of the feature, dubbed by Firemonkeys Studios as "Time-Shifted Multiplayer", was implemented in the mobile racing game Real Racing 3. These ghost cars can collide with the player and other vehicles, and are fully visible to the player.

In some rhythm game s, such as the Elite Beat Agents and Osu! Also: infinite health , infinite life , invincibility , invulnerability. Also hit points. Also independent video game. Also heads-up display HUD. A stage or level in a video game often an arcade game that stops the player's progress due to a software bug. Notable arcade kill screens include: [ relevant? Also multi-user domain , multi-user dungeon. Also cross-platform. Also platformer. Very occasionally may refer to the result of repeatedly balancing a game primarily through buffs , thus making every character substantially more powerful than they were at release.

Also rerolling. Also old-school gaming. Also grenade jumping. This is different from games such as first-person shooter s FPS , wherein the player-character in those games are all standardized forms and the physical skills of the player involved are the determining factor in their success or failure within the game. In an RPG, a human player can be the best player in the world at the game, but if they are using a character build that is substandard, they can be significantly outplayed by a lesser player running a more-optimal character build.

Also check point. Also game save , savegame , or savefile. A skill tree is called a "tree" because it uses a tiered system and typically branches out into multiple paths.

A tiered skill tree will require a player to achieve certain skills before the next tier of skills become available. The player may be required to achieve all skills in one tier before moving on to the next, or may only be required to complete prerequisites for individual branches. Skill trees are a common tool used for in-game balancing by game designers. Skill trees also offer a "game within a game" in which players are not only playing a video game, but their decisions on how they allocate points into their skill trees will affect their overall gaming experience.

The action roleplaying game Diablo II , released in , is often cited as the true innovator of in-depth skill trees. Also meat shield. Also tech tree. The initial screen of a computer , video , or arcade game after the credits and logos of the game developer and publisher are displayed. Early title screens often included all the game options available single player, multiplayer, configuration of controls, etc.

This can be attributed to the use of the title screen as a loading screen , in which to cache all the graphical elements of the main menu. Older computer and video games had relatively simple menu screens that often featured pre-rendered artwork. In arcade games, the title screen is shown as part of the attract mode loop, usually after a game demonstration is played.

The title screen and high score list urge potential players to insert coins. In console games, especially if the screen is not merged with the main menu, it urges the player to press start. Similarly, in computer games, the message "Hit any key " is often displayed. Controls that lack an actual "Start" button use a different prompt; the Wii , for example, usually prompts to press the "A" button and the "B" trigger simultaneously, as in Super Mario Galaxy 2 or Mario Party 9.

Fan-made games often parody the style of the title that inspired them.

Top 10 Card Games, time: 13:09
Akik
User
 
Posts: 21
Joined: 02.01.2020

Re: gambling card games lexicon online

Postby Arashigore В» 02.01.2020

However, http://castdraw.site/gambling-movies/gambling-movies-forceful-1.php is no player control over the character during recovery frames, and the character can not perform elxicon movement or attacks until just click for source recovered. Louis, MO19 Jan. Rock Paper Shotgun. Aboveboard is one of the older words on this list, dating in use back to the late 16th century. Retrieved May 2,

Gak
Moderator
 
Posts: 723
Joined: 02.01.2020

Re: gambling card games lexicon online

Postby Moshakar В» 02.01.2020

Originally built into arcade game s, the main purpose of the attract mode is to entice passers-by to play the game. Rock Paper Shotgun. Giant Bomb. Reese Communications. Also triple A.

Voodoot
Guest
 
Posts: 587
Joined: 02.01.2020


38 posts В• Page 412 of 464

Return to Gambling card games



 
Powered by phpBB В© 2003-2012 phpBB Group